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Dartford District Archaeological Group (DDAG)

The Christopher St John Breen Roman Pottery Archive
An aid to identifying sherds from excavations

Suggested reading books and internet resources

Pottery in Roman Britain (Shire Archaeology) by Guy de la Bedoyere

Samian Ware (Shire Archaeology) by Guy de la Bedoyere

Roman Samian Pottery in Britain by Peter Webster  C.B.A. Practical Handbook in Archaeology 13
   PDF version can be downloaded
Here

The Roman Pottery of Kent by Richard Pollard
   Doctoral thesis completed in 1982, published 1988 by Kent Archaeological Society now out print, 13 copies in various Kent Lending Library Reference Collections.
    available online at
http://www.kentarchaeology.org.uk/Research/Pub/RPofK/Contents.htm

The National Roman Fabric Reference Collection: a Handbook
  
now out of print but available online at http://romanpotterystudy.org.uk/nrfrc/base/index.php

Romano-British Coarse Pottery: A Students Guide  now out of print but available online http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/catalogue/adsdata/arch-281-1/dissemination/pdf/cba_rr_006.pdf

The Pottery of Roman Britain by Paul Tyers now out of print but most text available online below

Potsherd http://potsherd.net/atlas/potsherd
  The homepage of Paul Tyers. An excellent website based on Paul's book 'The Pottery of Roman Britain' with good quality photographs of sherds of various fabrics and forms. A clickable map of locations of pottery listed in the Roman Pottery Bibliography section of J.R.P.S. Well worth taking time to explore.

The Study Group for Roman Pottery (SGRP) http://romanpotterystudy.org/  was formed in 1971 to further the study of pottery of the Roman period in Britain. It provides a forum for the presentation and discussion of the latest research, and of issues affecting the subject and its practitioners. The annual conference and regional meetings promote contact between specialists and the opportunity to handle pottery from different regions
   Be sure to look at the Group's Journal of Roman Pottery Studies that is published by Oxbow Books for the Study Group for Roman Pottery. It publishes papers on Roman pottery and related subjects. In addition to papers on material from Britain, the Journal includes studies from across the Roman empire.
  
Each paper submitted to the Journal is peer-reviewed by two referees (of course this process ensures that reviewers are fully independent of the authors, for example, not affiliated with the same institution). In addition, an Editorial Board supports the Editor to ensure that the Journalís output is of the highest academic quality.
   Volumes 1 to 6 can be downloaded via links. Volumes 7 to 16 are available from Oxbow books with contents pages downloadable on the website,

The Archaeology of Roman London Volume 5 - CBA Research Report 98  A dated corpus of early Roman pottery from the City of London by Barbara Davies, Beth Richardson and Roberta Tomber
Download a PDF copy from:- http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/cba_rr/rr98.cfm

Upchurch and Thameside Roman Pottery by Jason Monaghan BAR British Series 173 pub. 1987
A ceramic typology for northern Kent, first to third centuries A.D. http://tedconnell.org.uk/AFW/03/00.htm

Grog-tempered 'Belgic' Pottery of South-eastern England by By Isobel Thompson
Originally published as BAR British Series 108 1982 (now out of print). http://tedconnell.org.uk/AFW/02/00.htm

Worcestershire Ceramics Online Database has been enhanced to include locally produced medieval form types, and fabric and form information for the most commonly identified post-medieval and modern fabrics, as well as concordance information for other type series in surrounding counties. In addition,  a software upgrade means that data is more accessible and the site is now also optimised for use on mobile devices. To ensure that users get the most out of these improvement, it is recommended that the 'Help' pages are consulted before using the site for the first time.
   The database you see now was designed to make the complete pottery fabric and form type series for Worcestershire accessible on-line. It currently contains information on all the pottery fabrics used and made in Worcestershire from the Neolithic (c 4000 BC) to the early post-medieval period (c 1650 AD) and the most commonly identified fabrics of later post-medieval and modern date.   For each type of pottery the ceramic database contains information on:

Gloucester Pottery Archive The Gloucester pottery fabric type series includes samples of pottery and tile fabrics dating to the Roman, medieval and post-medieval periods from Gloucester and the surrounding districts. It was created in the 1970s by the Gloucester Archaeology Unit, and has formed the foundation of most work on archaeological ceramics in the area since then.
  
The type series is currently housed in Gloucester City Museum. This web resource was created to make information on the fabric type series more widely available, to incorporate data on the distribution of some of the principal wares in Gloucestershire, and to link the Gloucester series to other web sites dealing with Roman and Medieval pottery fabrics. The individual pages on the fabrics represented in the collection include images of the sherds in the collection, brief descriptions with notes on source and dating, and links to other resources where available.
   The pages on the individual fabrics can be accessed through tabulated listings of Roman or Medieval and later fabrics, which can be sorted or filtered, or through a set of sortable 'cards' (Roman or Medieval and later).
   This web site was developed by Jane Timby and Paul Tyers from data collected at Gloucester City Museum between January and March 2017. We are grateful to David Rice for facilitating access to the Gloucester TF collection.

Return to The Christopher St John Breen Roman Pottery Archive Introduction

This website is constructed by enthusiastic amateurs. Any errors noticed by other researchers will be gratefully received so that 
we can amend our pages to give as accurate a record as possible. Please send details to localhistory@tedconnell.org.uk