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Archaeologia Cantiana -  Vol. 1  1858  page 85

Hackington, or St Stephen'sí, Canterbury. Collar of SS. 
By Edward Foss, F.S.A.

to be antagonists, or rather when no claimants remained in the York interest, it was found expedient to subject the wearers to some regulation; and consequently the statute of Henry VIII., limiting its use, was enacted.
   The portrait of Sir Thomas More, painted by Holbein shortly before the passing of that statute, represents him with the collar of SS joined together at the ends by two portcullises with a rose pendent. It is the only known instance of a Lord Chancellor being distinguished by that ornament. Whatever therefore may have been the previous practice, of which we have no knowledge, either from monumental brass, or picture, or description, it may be presumed that from that time the very limitation in the statute would prevent persons holding so high a dignity from adopting a collar which even knights were permitted to wear. The practice even with knights soon went out of fashion, till at last the use of the collar of SS became gradually confined to certain persons in official positions, who alone were privileged to wear it, either in gold or silver, according to their grade in the royal household.
   That the privilege did not extend to the puisne judges of the Courts at Westminster, though previously to the reign of Elizabeth they, almost without an exception, received the honour of knighthood, is very certain. Among all the monumental or pictorial representations of these worthies, either between the accession of Henry IV. and Edward IV., or, with a single doubtful exception, subsequently to the latter period, up to the present time, there is no instance in which the collar of SS is introduced. The exception referred to is the monument of Richard Harper in Swarkestone church, in Derbyshire. He was a judge of the Common Pleas in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, and is represented in full legal costume, with the addition of the collar of SS, which, without some other explanation, we must attribute

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